Plenary Speakers


Jimenez

Dr. José Miguel Jiménez 

CERN

Low Temperature Technologies for Accelerators and Detectors at CERN

José Miguel Jiménez has a double diploma of Engineer and PhD in Applied Physics. After several internships in referent Labs and diverse technical activities, he joined the CEA Saclay (1991) to work on radiation tolerance of satellite’s electronics to proton’s bombardment. Later, he joined the pole of accelerators where he completed a PhD on the performance of accelerating superconducting radiofrequency cavities.

He was recruited by CERN in 1994 as an in-house expert in the area of ​​vacuum technology for the energy upgrade of the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP). He was in charge of designing, building, improving and operating different accelerators at CERN, including the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). And further developed his engineering and scientific career, becoming a referent in the phenomena induced by the circulation of particle beams, and electron avalanche mechanisms induced by high energy and intensity beams.

Since January 2014, he has been leading the Technology Department of CERN. One of the world's largest centre of excellence in accelerator technologies, with a team of more than 500 people. The mandate is to ensure high standard of performance for the organization, spanning operations, maintenance, consolidation and upgrades. He also drives the research and development of new technologies necessary for future CERN projects in accordance with the recommendations of the European Strategy for Particle Physics. The main areas of activity of the department are magnets (normal and superconducting), integration and protection systems, cryogenics, ultra-high vacuum, plasma coatings and surface treatments.

As an expert in the fields of vacuum technologies and beam-induced vacuum instabilities including electron cloud, he developed project managerial competences in particular by coordinating the Long Shutdown 2 (2015-2020) across CERN accelerator complex and associated infrastructures. The mission was to lead, drive and monitor the execution of all activities in CERN accelerator complex and associated infrastructures, as well as supporting all experimental areas for technical and general services.

José Miguel Jiménez co-chairs the CEA, FAIR, ITER and CIEMAT Collaboration Steering Committees and is member of the ITER Operation Network (ION), IFMIF EVEDA Project Committee and CIEMAT and LIP Scientific Advisory Board. At CERN, he has also been the representative of CERN management in several key internal management processes and safety roles and committees.

He has contributed to 100+ scientific publications, out of which one third as the main author on beam-induced instabilities, electron cloud and vacuum technology. He has delivered more than 100+ talks at international conferences and workshops and tens of seminars in Institutions, Universities and Foundations. He has also been a lecturer in the CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and in the Joint University Accelerator School (JUAS).

José Miguel Jiménez was awarded in 2016, a Spanish civil decoration — Encomienda (Commander Cross) — of the Order of Alfonso X the Wise, and in 2022, he received the Officer Cross of the Civil Order of Isabel la Catolica.

José Miguel Jiménez has a double diploma of Engineer and PhD in Applied Physics. After several internships in referent Labs and diverse technical activities, he joined the CEA Saclay (1991) to work on radiation tolerance of satellite’s electronics to proton’s bombardment. Later, he joined the pole of accelerators where he completed a PhD on the performance of accelerating superconducting radiofrequency cavities.

He was recruited by CERN in 1994 as an in-house expert in the area of ​​vacuum technology for the energy upgrade of the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP). He was in charge of designing, building, improving and operating different accelerators at CERN, including the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). And further developed his engineering and scientific career, becoming a referent in the phenomena induced by the circulation of particle beams, and electron avalanche mechanisms induced by high energy and intensity beams.

Since January 2014, he has been leading the Technology Department of CERN. One of the world's largest centre of excellence in accelerator technologies, with a team of more than 500 people. The mandate is to ensure high standard of performance for the organization, spanning operations, maintenance, consolidation and upgrades. He also drives the research and development of new technologies necessary for future CERN projects in accordance with the recommendations of the European Strategy for Particle Physics. The main areas of activity of the department are magnets (normal and superconducting), integration and protection systems, cryogenics, ultra-high vacuum, plasma coatings and surface treatments.

As an expert in the fields of vacuum technologies and beam-induced vacuum instabilities including electron cloud, he developed project managerial competences in particular by coordinating the Long Shutdown 2 (2015-2020) across CERN accelerator complex and associated infrastructures. The mission was to lead, drive and monitor the execution of all activities in CERN accelerator complex and associated infrastructures, as well as supporting all experimental areas for technical and general services.

José Miguel Jiménez co-chairs the CEA, FAIR, ITER and CIEMAT Collaboration Steering Committees and is member of the ITER Operation Network (ION), IFMIF EVEDA Project Committee and CIEMAT and LIP Scientific Advisory Board. At CERN, he has also been the representative of CERN management in several key internal management processes and safety roles and committees.

He has contributed to 100+ scientific publications, out of which one third as the main author on beam-induced instabilities, electron cloud and vacuum technology. He has delivered more than 100+ talks at international conferences and workshops and tens of seminars in Institutions, Universities and Foundations. He has also been a lecturer in the CERN Accelerator School (CAS) and in the Joint University Accelerator School (JUAS).

José Miguel Jiménez was awarded in 2016, a Spanish civil decoration — Encomienda (Commander Cross) — of the Order of Alfonso X the Wise, and in 2022, he received the Officer Cross of the Civil Order of Isabel la Catolica.

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Crespi Pierre

Dr. Pierre Crespi

Air Liquide

Cryogenics for Power and Energy: A Winning Ticket ?
 

Pierre Crespi has a doctorate in fluid mechanics and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at NASA in 1990. He worked as an aerodynamic test engineer on the Ariane 5 rocket then on the French TGV between 1991 and 1995, before joining Air Liquide advanced Technologies. He created three cryogenic machines for scientific experiments in space (International Space Station for NASA, PLANCK & HERSCHEL space telescopes for ESA). In 2002 he participated in the creation of a new division dedicated to orbital cryogenics, then took charge of the management of all of ALAT's space activities (ARIANE 5 cryogenic tanks, cryogenics for satellites). From 2008, he created Advanced Technology Japan in Kobe (Hydrogen for energy and Helium for sciences) then in 2011 he returned to ALAT as director of innovation: H2 Energy, biogas, maritime LNG, space cryogenics, H2 for aviation, quantum computing, fuel cells, etc. Since 2021 he has focused more particularly on foresight and strategy. Its specialties are energy transition and hydrogen energy for mobility.

 


Decker
Alekseev

Mr. Lutz Decker (Linde Kryotechnik) Dr. Alexander Alekseev (Linde GmbH)

Cryogenics for Future Hydrogen Infrastructure

Lutz Decker

After completing my master's degree in process engineering at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich (ETHZ) in 1990, I started my first job in industry in the process engineering department of Sulzer in Switzerland. One year later, the cryotechnology team at Sulzer became Linde Kryotechnik (LKT). I worked as a senior process engineer for helium liquefiers and refrigerators as well as hydrogen liquefiers. This included developing logic and control systems and supervising the commissioning of the plants. As head of the Machinery and Testbench department, I was responsible for the processing of all project-related machines and their auxiliary units as well as for the development of LKT's own turbomachinery such as TED expanders, cold compressors and circulators. In the role of Development Manager, I coordinated LKT's innovation projects in the areas of machinery, components, processes and tools. As the designated expert for cryogenics <80 K within Linde plc, my work now focuses on strategic development, networking, fundamental research, IP etc.

Alexander Alekseev

After my studies at the Moscow Institute for Power Engineering (MEI) in Russia, in 1994, I started my Ph.D at the Technical University of Dresden with Prof. H. Quack. After graduating in 1999, I went to California and enjoyed a stay at the Stanford University (Prof. W. Little) as a guest scientist. In 2000, I got my first industrial position in the engineering department of the company Messer Cryotherm in Germany. Five years later, I moved to the company Linde in Munich as a process design engineer for air separation. Later, I worked on technologies for CO2 capture and storage, cryogenic energy storage, cryogenic isotope separation, cooling of HTSC applications, flexibilization of cryogenic process plants and liquid hydrogen-related topics. Simultaneously, since 2012, I have been a lecturer for Cryogenics at the TU Munich, Chair of Plant and Process Technology. Since 2021, I am honorary professor there. Linde career:
    •    Linde RD Fellow (since 2014)
    •    Innovation Manager, Innovation and Technology (2015-2017)
    •    Senior Expert for Carbon Capture and Storage (2011-2015)
         Process Design Engineer (2000-2010


Senatore

Prof. Carmine Senatore


University of Geneva, Switzerland

Advancing Superconductor Technology for High Field Applications: Current State and Emerging Trends

Prof. Carmine Senatore was appointed head of the Group of Applied Superconductivity at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, in 2010. He received his MSc degree with honors in Physics in 2000 and completed his doctoral degree in 2004 at the University of Salerno, Italy. His formation as a solid-state physicist was focused on the vortex dynamics in high-Tc superconductors.
Currently, Professor Senatore's work is dedicated to advancing both low- and high-Tc superconductors for applications across various fields, including high-field magnets for NMR/MRI systems, particle accelerators, and fusion magnets.  His research aims to understand and control the fundamental properties necessary for the practical deployment of superconductors, exploring all facets of material science that influence superconductor functionality, alongside pioneering methods for processing these conductors at an industrial scale.
In 2016, in collaboration with Bruker BioSpin, his research group developed and tested a REBCO-based insert coil, establishing a new benchmark in Europe by achieving the highest magnetic field at the time with an all-superconducting magnet, attaining 25 T within the background of a 21 T LTS outsert.  Additionally, Senatore actively contributes to the CERN studies on next-generation accelerator magnets for a 100 TeV energy-frontier hadron collider and, more recently, for the muon collider.
In 2023, Senatore curated a transformation map on superconductivity for the World Economic Forum. This initiative aimed to promote and create awareness about the practical applications of superconductors among decision-makers in both the public and private sectors. Senatore has published more than 100 papers in refereed journals and has delivered over 60 oral presentations at international conferences.

 


badcock

Prof. Rod Badcock


Victoria University of Wellington, new Zealand

Electrification of Aviation Propulsion – Cryogenic Technologies that Enable the Next Generation of Propulsion Systems

Prof. Badcock is a multidisciplinary engineer and physicist better known for translating superconducting engineering and optical sensing in cryogenic environments into practice. He  is the research partner of Air New Zealand in their “Mission Next Gen” zero emission aviation programme and was a key member of the team awarded the Royal Society of New Zealand Cooper Medal in 2008 for the development of high-temperature superconducting cables for power system applications including 1 MVA transformer, 60 MW hydro generator, and 150 MW utility generator. In 2022 he was awarded the prestigious Royal Society Te Aparangi Pickering medal and the Wellingtonian of the Year Science and Technology winner for his work on superconducting engineering for all-electric aircraft. In 2023 he was awarded the Kiwinet / BNZ Researcher Entrepreneur Award for building an emerging clean tech economy taking New Zealand’s expertise to the world. Rod is motivated to bring these super-cool technologies into sustainable, energy intensive systems, and make the world a truly better place.


Kuriyama

Dr. Toru Kuriyama


Energy Systems R&D Center, TOSHIBA Energy Systems and Solution Corporation

Development of 4K-GM cryocooler and its applications for superconducting magnets

 

Since joining Toshiba in 1984, Dr. Toru Kuriyama has led developments of cryogenic cooling technology for superconducting magnets and has been the leading expert in this field. Especially, the world’s first 4K-Gifford-McMahon (GM cryocooler) as well as the cryocooler-cooled superconducting magnet are the most notable achievements.
Dr. Kuriyama adopted new magnetic materials such as Er3Ni and HoCu2 instead of commonly used lead regenerator material for a conventional GM cryocooler and he was the first to achieve 4K cooling with the two-stage GM cryocooler in 1990. He also developed the superconducting magnet which was cooled by the 4K-GM cryocooler directly without liquid helium in 1993. In addition, he has contributed to develop a high magnetic-field cryocooler-cooled superconducting magnet and high-temperature superconducting magnets.
After a ground-breaking work at Toshiba, Dr. Kuriyama is now a technical advisor after serving as Toshiba's Chief Fellow. His many achievements have made significant impacts to the field of cryogenic engineering, and he was awarded several academic and professional awards and honours both domestically and internationally. He also served as a board member of Cryogenics and Superconductivity Society of Japan and the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers (JSME). He was named as a JSME fellow and has been contributing to both cryogenic engineering and mechanical engineering in Japan. He has been lecturing on cryogenics at the universities for more than 20 years and has made significant contributions to the academia.